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Michael Pollitt

Michael Pollitt

Reader in Business Economics
Director of Studies in Management and Economics and Fellow of Sidney Sussex College

MA (University of Cambridge), MPhil, DPhil (University of Oxford)

Professional experience

Dr Pollitt is co-editor of Economics of Energy and Environmental Policy and a member of the editorial board of the Review of Industrial Organization and Competition and Regulation in Network Industries. He is also a Research Associate of the Centre for Business Research (CBR) and a member of the Faculty of Economics. He is currently a member of the Office of Rail Regulation's expert advisory panel, and an energy advisor to the Consumers' Association (Which?). Since 2000 he has been convenor of the Association of Christian Economists, UK.

Dr Pollitt has advised the UK Competition Commission, the New Zealand Commerce Commission, Ofgem, Ofwat, ESRC, the Norwegian Research Council, the DTI, the World Bank and the European Commission. He has also consulted for National Grid, AWG, Eneco, Nuon, Roche and TenneT. He is the Coach on the Cambridge MBA's "Energy & Environment" concentration, and the University's Energy Champion for Policy, Economics and Risk. He is Assistant Director of the Energy Policy Research Group, and a member of the Cambridge Corporate Governance Network.

Previous appointments

Before coming to Cambridge Judge Business School, Michael was a lecturer in applied industrial organisation at the Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, from 1994-1999. He was a board member and trustee of Viva Network, Oxford, from 1999-2004. In the first half of 2003 Michael was a Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at MIT. From 2001-2005 Michael was co-leader of the Cambridge-MIT Electricity Project.

In 2005 and 2006 Michael served as Acting Executive Director of the ESRC Energy Policy Research Group. In 2009 and 2010 he was a member of the New Zealand Commerce Commission's expert panel on Input Methodologies. From 2007-2011 he served as external economic advisor to Ofgem.

Research interests

Industrial economics; privatisation and regulation of utilities especially in electricity; the measurement of productive efficiency; the relationship between Christian ethics and best practice business behaviour.

Michael Pollitt is a member of the Economics & Policy subject group.

Selected publications

Jones, I.W., Pollitt, M. and Bek, D. (2007) Multinationals in their communities: a social capital approach to corporate citizenship projects. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Jamasb, T. and Pollitt, M. (2008) "Liberalisation and R&D in network industries: the case of the electricity industry." Research Policy, 37(6-7): 995-1008 (DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2008.04.010)

Grubb, M., Jamasb, T. and Pollitt, M. (eds.) (2008) Delivering the low-carbon electricity system: technologies, economics and policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Yang, H.L. and Pollitt, M. (2009) "Incorporating both undesirable outputs and uncontrollable variables into DEA: the performance of Chinese coal-fired power plants." European Journal of Operational Research, 197(3): 1095-1105 (DOI: 10.1016/j.ejor.2007.12.052)

Pollitt, M. (2010) "Does electricity (and heat) network regulation have anything to learn from fixed line telecoms regulation?" Energy Policy, 38(3): 1360-1371

Kwoka, J. and Pollitt, M. (2010) "Do mergers improve efficiency? Evidence from restructuring the US electric power sector." International Journal of Industrial Organization, 28(6): 645-656 (DOI: 10.1016/j.ijindorg.2010.03.001)

More publications

Contact details

Michael Pollitt
Cambridge Judge Business School
University of Cambridge
Trumpington Street
Cambridge CB2 1AG
UK

Tel: +44 (0)1223 339615
Fax: +44 (0)1223 339701
Email: m.pollitt@jbs.cam.ac.uk 

Research impact

Heating up regulation

Research from Dr Michael Pollitt and Dr Stephen Littlechild of Cambridge Judge Business School has been instrumental in developing a new system of regulation which encourages engagement with customers, say energy regulators.

Read more