Centre for Strategic Philanthropy news

Professor Kamal Munir of Cambridge Judge Business School, granted a state honour by Pakistan for achievements in education, talks about educational ecosystems, philanthropy and equality.

The University of Cambridge Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) is delighted to launch an in-depth, teachable case study on the Tony Elumelu Foundation (TEF).

Impact investment is a key complementary funding source in emerging markets like Nigeria, concludes a report by the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School, in collaboration with SME.NG and the Impact Investors Foundation.

“Creating a network of young women who become leaders and transform their communities as well as the country.” These are the words of Mahlogonolo Mashile, one of the founding team members at the GirLead SA alongside Nolukhanya Mqhayi. Both members are Masters students at Wits Business School in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Philanthropy in the Gulf Cooperation Council area is estimated at $210 billion annually and is growing in a more strategic way, says a new report by LGT, the international Private Banking and Asset Management Group owned by the Princely House of Liechtenstein, and the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School.

The COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic exposed the social inconsistencies in how we all go about our daily lives. It shed light on mental health issues as well as the value of wellness practices like meditation and yoga.

Why would any self-aware philanthropist associate themselves with the phrase 'Moonshot Philanthropy' at a time when big giving is routinely interpreted as a hubristic and self-aggrandising activity?

Physical spaces for community capacity-building are becoming increasingly scarce in today's rapidly urbanising world, particularly in communities that need them the most.

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) launched the first event of its new series ‘CSP in Conversation’, a succession of intimate interviews discussing key philanthropic and development initiatives in global growth markets – specifically Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia.

In today's fast-changing world, where poverty and inequality are still on the rise, we need creative and innovative ways to educate marginalised communities about health issues, particularly sexual health.

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) recently celebrated its second anniversary, solidifying its role as a hub for research and convening on philanthropy in global growth markets.

Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School announces philanthropic research framework for global growth markets. 

Following two years of implementing solutions, the winner of the Aspire Higher Project was announced at a final judging event hosted on 19 April 2022.

Blended finance is an approach to global development co-operation that recognises that private capital has a pivotal role to play in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2030.

Ten Radical Actions embodies the work of Radical Flexible Fund (RFF), which focuses on bringing together leaders and innovators from different parts of the donor and social change fields to demonstrate that there are more effective alternatives to the current system of funding.

As cash giving continues to decline and card payments have quickly dominated the way we spend, we find ourselves tapping our way through cafes, shops, and even train stations with less of us carrying a jingling pocket full of change.

Despite its name, 'inclusive finance' institutionalises uneven access to finance for poor citizens in Pakistan and elsewhere in the Global South, says a new study by Juvaria Jafri, Research Associate at the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School.

In her most recent piece for Development in Practice, Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) Research Associate Dr Shonali Banerjee investigates the complex role digital crowdfunding platforms play in non-profit fundraising.

As part of the 18th edition, held under the theme 'The Future Starts Now', Abu Dhabi Foundation announced the graduation of the first cohort of the Young Philanthropists Programme, which was launched in partnership with the University of Cambridge's Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) based in Cambridge Judge Business School.

This autumn, the team at the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) added two more episodes to the #ShiftThePower series franchise, launched in June 2021. The series unites global practitioners and academics in emerging markets with their Global North counterparts to build a movement for change around philanthropic power dynamics.

In September, the team at the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) held a strategy week at the Cambridge Judge Business School to discuss ongoing research, education and thought leadership outputs, and brainstorm new opportunities for 2022 to 'scale up' the Centre's delivery.

Like so many others, we at the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) watched in horror as the Taliban seized control of all territories across Afghanistan during the month of August, in what has inevitably become an international crisis for the millions of Afghan citizens. 

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) at the University of Cambridge and the Centre on African Philanthropy and Social Investment (CAPSI) at the University of the Witwatersrand are delighted to announce a landmark collaborative partnership to further understand the impact of philanthropy across African communities, private sector organisations, foundations, and key individuals.

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) launched the #ShiftThePower monthly seminar series, which brings together prominent voices from the Global South and the Global North to discuss the rapidly growing need to shift philanthropic power dynamics.

In her recent piece for Third World Quarterly, Dr Shonali Banerjee shares findings from her research with philanthropic crowdfunding platforms in India.

Last month the Centre debuted its executive education programme, entitled 'Strategic Philanthropy in Emerging Markets: Maximising Impact'.

Each of our research centres has unique ways to engage with non-academic organisations and, through that, to generate real world impact. This month we decided to share with you the work of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School.

We reflect on Global Philanthropic's recent Talking Philanthropy forum, co-hosted with the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School and the Lee Juan Yew School of Public Policy, and take a look at the three individuals who won special awards for their charitable endeavours.

Kamal Munir of Cambridge Judge named first winner of Desautels Distinguished PhD Alumnus Award by McGill University.

The Centre’s launch could not have been timelier as it coincided with the onset of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic and subsequent renewed interest in philanthropy – notably as a source of rapid response capital – as a means of bringing innovation to entrenched socio-economic global challenges.

By Clare Woodcraft, Executive Director for the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy The world of philanthropy is changing. The global pandemic has rendered this scarce but innovative and risk-friendly resource ever more valuable but ever more scrutinised. The opportunity for philanthropic donations to help contribute to the aftermath of the crisis, support the drive to fund the UN's Sustainable Development Goals and encourage the private sector to embed social purpose into its DNA has never been stronger. COVID-19 (coronavirus) revealed a lot that was wrong with the sector – too many conditions, short time horizons, not enough listening and ironically (for a sector that is ostensibly well-positioned to be entrepreneurial), too much bureaucracy. However, the crisis revealed that when philanthropists do unite, they can be a powerful force for good and for change. Our research during the pandemic showed that many philanthropists did respond quickly to COVID-19 redeploying funds to support the health sector, reducing earlier restrictions on the disbursement of grants, engaging more effectively with their grantees and generally taking a more strategic approach to ensure that their philanthropic investments generate maximum impact. But the sector still struggles to apply such flexible behaviour consistently with practices varying widely from country…

An article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review by Clare Woodcraft and Kamal Munir of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School outlines findings of a pandemic-induced shift in the Global North-Global South philanthropic power balance.

Researchers affiliated with the University of Cambridge are invited to submit proposals relating to work with clear policy implications for enhancing existing understandings of philanthropy in global growth markets

In this webinar, jointly hosted with the Tharawat Family Business Forum, we explored the difference and overlaps between corporate and private giving.

HRH Princess Lamia Alsaud, the Secretary General and a member of the Board of Trustees of Al Waleed Philanthropies speaks to Badr Jafar about the organization’s role in supporting the country’s National Strategies, it’s humanitarian aid efforts around the world, and her advocacy to women.

Dr Kamal Munir joins Lord Bilimoria of Chelsea and Julia Streets in a discussion on how to change the race ratio in financial services organisations.

Conversatio with Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, where he shares his hopes for the coming years, and discusses issues around inclusivity, and the most effective ways to elevate diverse voices in the global agenda.

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) is delighted to announce Dr Shonali Banerjee as its new Research Associate.

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) is delighted to announce the appointment of two new team members: Di Kennedy, our new Centre Manager and Jack Lilley, our new Communications Manager.

IMF​’s Managing Director, Kristalina Georgieva and the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy’s Founding Patron, Badr Jafar discuss the evolving role of philanthropy​ and the related opportunities and challenges around the strategic deployment of vast sums of philanthropic capital to help solve our world’s greatest challenges.

COVID-19 is accelerating an already exist trend: the awakening of institutional philanthropy in the global south.

Trillions of dollars are expected to be passed on to the next generation of aspiring philanthropists within the next decade. In this interview, the Vice-Chancellor Professor Stephen Toope, and Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) Founding Patron Badr Jafar, discuss the links between academic research and impactful and scalable philanthropy within and from the emerging markets. The Business of Philanthropy is a new series of conversations with thought and action global leaders hosted by Badr Jafar, Founding Patron of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy. The series explores the changing nature of philanthropy within and from the emerging markets. Subscribe to the series.…

Examples of questions explored in this interview with renowned philanthropists Nandan and Rohini Nilekani, conducted by Badr Jafar, Founding Patron of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy: Are there some golden rules for strategic philanthropy?How is technology changing the philanthropic sector?How will COVID-19 impact our ability to achieve the SDGs by 2030?What are the current trends around giving in India?…

Philanthropy

Top 15 reads of 2020

The news and insight section of Cambridge Judge Business School's website attracts audiences with eclectic interests ranging from business to healthcare to the arts. In 2020, attention was focused on articles related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Philanthropy

Improving philanthropy

COVID-19 pandemic shows the need to address the North-South power imbalance in global philanthropy, says report by the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at the University of Cambridge Judge Business School. A new report into global philanthropy released today (15 December) says the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic has highlighted the need to address inequalities in the philanthropic relationship between the Global North and South, including more core funding and local networks in the South. The report – entitled Philanthropy and COVID-19: Is the North-South Power Balance Finally Shifting? – is the first publication from the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy, which launched operations in June 2020 with a mission to examine philanthropy within and from the world's highest-growth markets including Africa, developing Asia and the Middle East. Through interviews conducted with two dozen Global South Social Purpose Organisations (SPOs) and foundations during the COVID pandemic – as well as analysis of secondary data – the report finds that COVID-19 has revealed "a deep sense of dissatisfaction with the status quo" in global philanthropy. While philanthropic foundations in the Global North have historically exercised considerable control over how resources are allocated to Global South grantees, the urgent demands of the pandemic have started to…

The Executive Director of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP), Clare Woodcraft participated in a discussion hosted by the Nama Women Advancement Establishment, a leading organisation on women's empowerment in the UAE and Save the Children, addressing the topic of Local Voices: Creating an Equitable World for Girls.

The growth in emerging market philanthropy could not be occurring at a more critical time. Government budgets are coming under ever increasing pressure from the pandemic and the global downturn. Badr Jafar, the Founding Patron of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy, explains the role philanthropy has in bridging the annual funding gap to meet SDGs in an interview with CNBC Africa.

Pandemic will have 'profound' impact on philanthropy through greater collaboration, Bill Gates says in interview with Badr Jafar, founding patron of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School. The COVID-19 (coronavirus) crisis will have a "profound" impact on philanthropy through forging more active collaboration and ensuring more equitable responses, Bill Gates says in a video interview conducted by the founding patron of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School, Badr Jafar. The co-founder of the Gates Foundation said the "scale and urgency of the pandemic" has prompted philanthropists to engage "in more active collaboration, not only with businesses and government but also with each other." As an example, he cited the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator involving the Gates Foundation, Mastercard, Wellcome and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, founded by Priscilla Chan and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates said that philanthropists are "uniquely positioned to ensure an equitable response to a challenge, in COVID's case to ensure that diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines reach the billions of people who need them, at an affordable cost. "Philanthropy is also very good at moving quickly, finding new innovations, trying out things that governments will be very slow to do…

Philanthropic capital is risk capital – an attribute often overlooked amidst the race to secure measurable positive outcomes to report back to donors and boards. Philanthropy has always accepted investing for zero financial return and with the advent of Venture Philanthropy that mimics the principles of Venture Capital, can readily embrace and learn from failure. Indeed, perhaps the most powerful proposition of philanthropy is this ability to focus primarily on social impact rather than financial gain. In theory, this could drive innovation, radically new ways of thinking and experimental ways of finding new solutions to old problems. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. In a blog post on the OECD’s Development Matters blog, Clare Woodcraft, the CSP Executive Director, argues that COVID-19 has brought a timely reminder that risk and philanthropy should go hand in hand. Some have already risen to the challenge. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, along with Wellcome and Mastercard, have set up a $125 million seed fund for the accelerated identification and development of treatments for coronavirus. Beyond COVID-19, the UN’s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals could also potentially be accelerated if the trillions of dollars of philanthropic capital available were systematically pooled for innovation. The…

Centre for Strategic Philanthropy study examines the emergence, viability and legitimacy gain of corporate philanthropy. A new study written by Cambridge Judge Business School MPhil student Elena Christodoulou (also a member of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy's team) on the Emergence, Viability and Legitimacy Gain of Corporate Philanthropy provides insights into the "legitimacy gain" of corporate philanthropy. It assesses the history behind why corporations give, how they give and the evolution of corporate philanthropy as a distinct category. In her thesis, Elena notes that there has been significant evolution of the sector from traditional giving through foundations and wealthy individuals to more sophisticated forms of social investment such as venture philanthropy. Within this context, corporate philanthropy has emerged as a distinct category since it was first identified in the 1950s. Since that time, however, it has not always been seen in a positive light having frequently been accused of whitewashing and regarded with suspicion. Corporate philanthropy suffers from the heterogeneity of its stakeholder base and its associated diverse expectations and interests. While some stakeholders consider corporate philanthropy as an unnecessary cost that defies the economic interests of the firm, others urge businesses to give more and to give better. Increasingly…

The emergency in Lebanon caused by the explosion of a stock of ammonium nitrate has created a devastating new level of crisis in a country already ravaged by COVID-19 and the entrenched failure of the public sector and political leadership. On 7 March 2020, the country defaulted on its debt sending the economy into free fall. Lebanon's economy, primarily based on finance, real estate and tourism, relied heavily on remittances from the diaspora. The Central Bank had been borrowing dollars from commercial banks, a strategy that failed when bank deposits started declining. Now consumer prices are set to go up 53 per cent while the currency falls steeply – while the Lebanese pound is pegged at 1500 to a dollar, in open market a dollar fetches 4000 pounds. The toll all this has taken on the Lebanese people is enormous. Clearly financial resources are needed urgently and philanthropic grants (quick to market and easy to disburse) should be leading the way. Specific practical needs have been well documented by the Center for Disaster Philanthropy and range from medical support, to housing, cash assistance and basic food stuffs. All of these were already massively underfunded and in short supply before the…

The Executive Director and the Academic Director of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) have joined the Expert Group of the OECD's Centre on Philanthropy to support the forthcoming production of Volume 2 of the Centre's Private Philanthropy for Development report. Clare Woodcraft and Dr Kamal Munir will provide strategic advice to guide the development of the second volume of the survey which will investigate how foundations have adapted their giving strategy in response to the new development agenda, to global challenges such as COVID-19 and within emerging economies. It will provide foundation leaders, government policy makers and decision makers from civil society with up-to-date open access data and evidence-based analysis on global philanthropy for development. Initial analysis and recommendations are expected to be published in the summer of 2021. The CSP's current research on COVID-19 (to be published in October 2020) will inform the work of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on the response of philanthropists to the crisis. The CSP's executive team has been actively engaged in the OECD's dedicated network for foundations, netFWD, since its establishment in 2013.…

Under the auspices of the CSP, Dr Matthew Grimes and Professor Danielle Logue have initiated the "From Hype to Impact: Social Stock Exchanges" research project. Under the auspices of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP), Dr Matthew Grimes and Professor Danielle Logue have initiated a new research project which will examine the global "hype" or cultural momentum surrounding the practice of impact investing and specifically social stock exchanges (SSEs). While there is clear interest from investors and venture philanthropists (supply side), as well as from social enterprises and not for profits (demand side), these groups struggle to connect, communicate, and agree on measures of (financial and social) return. Thus, while the economics of this market seem apparent, the social infrastructure consisting of relations, norms and shared meaning systems among participants is absent, hindering development. Social stock exchanges are investment platforms that attempt to connect investors with social enterprises and have recently been established in Kenya, Singapore, Brazil, London, Toronto and the US. They were initially viewed as part of the solution for accelerating positive social change and increasing the impact of philanthropy within emerging markets and yet several have already collapsed or significantly pivoted. Few have been able to successfully…

Companies need 'awkward conversations' to address lack of diversity, Dr Kamal Munir of Cambridge Judge says on BBC programme. Companies need to have "awkward conversations" to prompt managers to fix the lack of progress in racial equality in the workplace, Kamal Munir, Reader in Strategy & Policy at Cambridge Judge Business School, said on The Bottom Line programme on BBC Radio 4. The programme – entitled "How to build a racially diverse business" – was hosted by BBC presenter Evan Davis, who said that "good intentions have been around for decades" but have not led to the changes that many people want. "We need to encourage people to have these awkward conversations," said Kamal, who was a guest on the programme. "We need to go beyond unconscious bias training and actually engage managers in this bigger problem and right this historic wrong where we're not making progress" in recruiting and promoting BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) people. Kamal cited statistics that showed 37 per cent of companies in the FTSE 100 index do not have a single BAME director on their board, only five per cent of directors in the FTSE 250 are BAME directors, and "in terms of…

Fundraising from individual or institutional donors is a surprisingly under-researched topic given how critical it is to the financial sustainability of third sector organisations. Fundraising strategies are too often based on gut instinct, received wisdom, historical relationships and assumptions about what prompts givers to give, rather than hard evidence and facts. The CSP is planning to undertake a research project to try to better understand the behaviour of donors in order to help fundraising organisations raise capital more efficiently and more cost effectively. Third sector organisations spend a significant amount of time building databases, arranging meetings and engaging potential donors only to find that sometimes even after multiple discussions the donor has been wrongly targeted and has no interest in investing in a particular asset. Equally fundraisers often face conundrums about whether to offer up specific programmes for support (e.g. restricted funding) or encourage donors to give unconditional (unrestricted) funding. Conventional wisdom may suggest that fundraising is best done by aligning specific opportunities with the donor's personal or professional interests. However, in many cases, notably where the donor is already very familiar with and has confidence in the institution, they may happily offer unrestricted capital. Existing research suggests there may…

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP), has become a member of the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN) with a view to building its community in South East Asia and partnering with local practitioners to further the understanding and deployment of philanthropic capital. The AVPN is a leading ecosystem builder that is increasing the flow of capital into the social sector and ensuring that resources are most effectively deployed. AVPN sees social investment as a continuum that encompasses everything from philanthropy and venture philanthropy to impact investing, CSR and sustainable investment. "The AVPN is particularly well placed to support our mission," says the CSP Executive Director, Clare Woodcraft, "given its focus on catalytic models such as Venture Philanthropy and its drive to build more efficiency and better outcomes along the continuum of capital. We expect that our own research agenda will contribute to discussions on this topic and very much hope to engage regularly and deeply with both the AVPN team and their membership base." The CSP team have historically worked with the AVPN network and their sister organisation the European Venture Philanthropy Association (EVPA) and believe that using existing networks can help the CSP scale the impact of its work…

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) is delighted to announce the appointment of Caroline Fiennes as a Visiting Fellow. One of the few people whose work has appeared in both OK! Magazine and the scientific journal Nature, Caroline brings a wealth of experience with donors and funders of many types, in many sectors and many countries (including those emerging markets that form the basis of the CSP’s focus) over many years. She has worked with donors in the Gulf, South Africa, Hong Kong, India, and donors active elsewhere in Asia, Africa and Latin America. She runs Giving Evidence, which encourages and enables giving based on sound evidence, which involves both advising donors (and sometimes operational non-profits) in various continents, and producing and publishing original research to inform their decisions. She wrote the "How To Give It" column in the Financial Times for three years, the first column about philanthropy in any major newspaper globally. She is author of the acclaimed book It Ain’t What You Give, It’s The Way That You Give It, which is a guide for donors. She has also written about effective philanthropy in Freakonomics, Forbes, the Daily Mail and spoken at TED. She has taught at Cambridge,…

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) has become a member of the Worldwide Initiatives for Grantmaker Support (WINGS). WINGS is a global network of philanthropy associations, networks, academic institutions, support organisations and funders whose purpose is to strengthen, promote and provide leadership on the development of philanthropy and social investment. "The CSP is keen to engage with practitioners in emerging markets," notes the Executive Director, Clare Woodcraft. "We are building a research portfolio that we hope will offer up actionable solutions to help improve and scale impact in philanthropy. By working with existing networks and intermediaries, we want to fast track our outreach, reach more practitioners and in turn, generate more impact. We are particularly delighted to become a member of WINGS given their reputation for dynamism and engagement. We hope to be able to partner with them on multiple projects aimed at disseminating our research findings and building our executive education programme specifically for emerging markets," she said. WINGS aims to unlock philanthropy's potential by strengthening its ecosystem of support organisations and comprises a diverse member base that works in multiple aspects of philanthropy in 45 countries.…

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy has partnered with Caroline Fiennes, the Director of Giving Evidence, to study the response of philanthropy to the COVID-19 crisis. Caroline has over 18 years' experience in the philanthropy sector, with deep expertise on how best to demonstrate and improve the impact of philanthropic capital. She has worked around the globe including in core emerging markets where the CSP focuses (Middle East and Africa). She is an outspoken advocate for better data and research to help improve the sector's effectiveness: she has written extensively on the topic including in her column in the Financial Times. Caroline has already undertaken significant research on philanthropic behaviour in the undertaken significant research on philanthropic behaviour in the UK. In this project, Caroline and CSP's team will use their expertise on philanthropy in development to understand how philanthropic donors have responded to the corona crisis. Specifically the team will seek to understand whether any of the responses triggered by COVID-19 – for instance, in terms of how donors support their grantees – might foretell a permanent change in modus operandi and/or raise broader questions about how the sector can best respond not only to crises but also to the…

The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy is producing an industry report that will assess initial responses to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) crisis by the global philanthropic community with a focus on emerging markets. It will seek to understand how philanthropy is rising to the challenge and what, if any, measures are being taken, and why. It will aim to understand if there is any shift towards specific geographies (e.g. low-income countries) and/or towards specific sectors (e.g. health care) and how this has impacted decision making. In the current coronavirus pandemic, many foundations and donors are responding – by changing their behaviour and giving practices, by making more grants, by increasing their rate of pay-out, by moving to unrestricted funding, by streamlining their processes and by switching priority areas. This research will aim to understand these behaviours, what is driving them and the reasons why. It is hoped that the research will provide key insights that can help inform the Centre's broader research agenda about how to improve effectiveness and impact. The research will be based on a small sample of foundations working in low- and middle-income countries with a focus on Africa, the Middle East and South East Asia. It will assess whether there has been a shift in their behaviour…

Dr Kamal Munir, Academic Director of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy, will be moderating a sub-plenary at the Annual Meeting of the European Group of Organization Studies. The topic of the panel is 'Where is Inequality in Organization Studies?' Over the last three decades, economic inequality has emerged as one of society's most pressing challenges. This is problematic not least because higher levels of economic inequality are associated with higher levels of social and health problems including higher rates of mortality, mistrust, crime, obesity, mental illnesses, violence, and incarceration rates and weaker democratic institutions. But what does all this have to do with organisations? Plenty, as it turns out. While most organisations claim to have instituted merit-based recruitment, promotion and related work practices, research shows that they continue to be key sites where gender, race and class-based inequalities are created, sustained and legitimised. And yet, within organisation theory and management literatures, organisations appear as largely neutral entities, focused on attainment of their goals. Gender-, race- and class-based inequalities remain largely invisible in our narratives. This sub-plenary will explore issues related to how and why organisations are heavily implicated in the phenomenon of inequality. It will also examine why such practices…

The Executive Director of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP), Clare Woodcraft, spoke on 2 July on the importance of research in helping to catalyse greater philanthropic impact in emerging markets. Woodcraft was invited to give a keynote at a webinar organised by the American University in Cairo's John D. Gerhart Centre, which produces research on philanthropy, civic engagement and responsible business. The discussion was chaired by the Gerhart Centre's Director Ali Awni and participants comprised the Centre's stakeholder base, including practitioners and academics in those markets of particular interest to the CSP (South East Asia, the Middle East and Africa). Visit Facebook to watch a recording of the webinar.…

Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) partners with Alliance Magazine to host a webinar on philanthropy in high growth markets. The Centre for Strategic Philanthropy (CSP) is partnering with Alliance Magazine to host a webinar on 1 July at 15:00 BST to discuss philanthropy in high growth markets. These markets – and notably Africa, developing Asia and the Middle East — are likely to be a significant source of philanthropic capital with an estimated trillion dollar intergenerational wealth transfer expected in the coming decade, $2 trillion of which in Asia alone. Moreover, and especially with the new-found focus on philanthropy in light of COVID-19, the sector finds itself at a unique point in history with a huge opportunity to do social good. There are now more people involved in philanthropy than ever before, but questions remain about how to deploy all of this potential effectively. The participants will comprise Badr Jafar, the founding patron of the CSP and the President of Crescent Petroleum in the UAE, Naina Batra, the CEO of the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network, Bhekinkosi Moyo, the Executive Director of the Centre on African Philanthropy and Social Investment at Wits Business School, Wits University, South Africa and the former…

A new Centre for Strategic Philanthropy has been established at the University of Cambridge Judge Business School, dedicated to examining strategic philanthropy within and from the world's highest-growth markets, including Africa, Developing Asia and the Middle East, at a time when philanthropy's role in building social and environmental resilience is seen as increasingly essential. Through a combination of rigorous research, executive education and the convening of diverse stakeholders, the Centre aims to become the leading hub of actionable knowledge to catalyse even greater philanthropic impact from the world's fastest growing regions. The Centre will also work with relevant institutions and practitioners in these regions in order to encourage collaboration and the sharing of knowledge and insights. The Centre is being launched in the midst of a fourth wave of globalisation that is resulting in a reallocation of economic power southward and eastward. In 2019, the top 30 fastest growing economies in the world were all in emerging markets. It is estimated that many trillions of dollars will be passed on from one generation to the next in these regions over the next 10 years, with close to $2 trillion wealth transfer by 2030 within Asia alone. This historic period of…

Like the rest of the world, we are deeply shocked and angered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Floyd's death is not an accident or a one-off. To us, it reflects the systemic racism that unfortunately continues to pervade many countries, including both the US and our own. Individuals and groups continue to be marginalised based on their race, gender and sexual orientation. This happens in subtle as well as not-so-subtle ways. At Cambridge Judge Business School, we take pride in the diversity of our community: from students to staff and faculty. The racialisation and consequent marginalisation of any particular group is utterly unacceptable to us. We support the Black Lives Matter campaign, as we support all ethnic minority members of our community. It can seem that we are living in a time when the opposite of inclusive values are flourishing, unchecked. We have resolved to use the abhorrent events of recent weeks as a catalyst for change. We will shortly announce additional steps we will be taking to play our part in making our world more just, fair and equal. We welcome your suggestions, as this is something we must address as a community. The School also expresses…

Synopsis of study co-authored by Dr Kamal Munir of Cambridge Judge Business School cited by Forbes magazine as one of five 'must-read' articles for business leaders in confronting racism. The synopsis of a study co-authored by Kamal Munir, Reader in Strategy & Policy and Academic Director of the Centre for Strategic Philanthropy at Cambridge Judge Business School, is featured in a new article in Forbes magazine as one of five "must-read" articles for every business leader in confronting racism. The article cites a two-page synopsis of an influential Academy of Management Annals study co-authored by Kamal which summarises more than 300 articles, books and reports on the topic of inequality, and particularly in the workplace. The synopsis is published in Academy of Management Insights. The study's authors "highlight five common organisational practices and three myths that reinforce inequality. We encourage you to dig deep into this one. It is well worth the effort!," says the Forbes article, which is written by Jim Ludema and Amber Johnson of the Center for Values-Driven Leadership at Benedictine University in Illinois. The five organisational practices cited in the journal article co-authored by Kamal revolve around hiring, promotion, role allocation, compensation and organisational structuring. In…

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