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Cambridge Judge Business School (CJBS) runs a number of seminar series, including those organised by the individual subject groups and research centres. Seminars are posted here as and when they are arranged, and tend to only take place in term-time. Sign up to our seminars mailing list to receive invitations.

Upcoming seminars

30
Nov

Online seminar – Value creation in shareholder activism

13:00 – 14:15

Enrique Schroth, Professor of Finance, EDHEC Business School

We measure value creation by activist investors via structural estimation of a model of the choice between passive investment and activism. Our estimates imply that average returns following activist intent announcements consist of 74.8% expected value creation, or treatment, 13.4% stock picking, and 11.8% sample selection effects. Higher treatment values predict improvements in firm performance and lower proxy contest probabilities, whereas abnormal announcements returns do not, suggesting that our estimate identifies more effective activism campaigns. The evidence demonstrates the importance of using the joint distribution of investment strategies and announcement returns to recover the expected returns and costs of activism.

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1
Dec

Online seminar – Licensing life saving drugs for developing countries: Evidence from the medicines patent pool

15:00 – 16:00

Alberto Galasso, Professor of Strategic Management, Rotman Chair in Life Sciences Commercialisation, University of Toronto

We study the effects of an institution that pools patents across geographical markets on the licensing and adoption of life saving drugs in low and middle income countries. Using data on licensing and sales for HIV, hepatitis C and tuberculosis drugs, we show that there is an immediate and large increase in licensing by generic firms when a patent is included in the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). The effect is heterogeneous across countries. The findings are robust to identification strategies to deal with endogeneity of MPP patents and countries. The impact on actual entry and sales, however, is much smaller than on licensing, which is due to geographic bundling of licenses by the MPP. More broadly, the paper highlights the potential of pools in promoting technology diffusion in developing countries.

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