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Why people’s sense of (un)fairness can harm their own interests

The ‘hold-up problem’ in business: new study co-authored at Cambridge Judge Business School highlights how concerns about fairness thwart beneficial reciprocity. A common dilemma facing investors is whether a partner receiving an investment will receive most of the gains flowing…

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A man and woman stand holding ladders of success with unequal steps.

The Times: Why admitting your flaws may earn your start-up more investment

Cambridge Judge Business School is mentioned in this article about how showing nerves when pitching may secure start-up founders more money from investors than if their presentations are perfect. The study is co-authored by Jochen Menges, Associate Professor in Organisational…

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Why flaws can pay: entrepreneurs need not seem perfect in seeking investors

Entrepreneurs who expose flaws like insecurity can boost investment by attracting investors with similar flaws, finds study co-authored by Dr Jochen Menges of Cambridge Judge that won a top Academy of Management award. Dr Jochen Menges The stereotype of an…

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Stressed young woman waiting for job interview.

Can members with heterogeneous preferences achieve their first-best within a group?

by Dr Shiqi Chen, Research Associate, Cambridge Centre for Finance and Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance One standard assumption of the existing corporate finance literature is firms' policies are set to maximise total shareholders' value, irrespective of individual stockholders'…

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Financial stock market abstract graph.

Institutional investor monitoring and earnings management: a network approach

by Dr Marwin Mönkemeyer, Visiting Associate at Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance, University of Cambridge Judge Business School Ever since Berle and Means' (1932) seminal work on the separation of ownership and control in modern firms, scholars have debated…

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Two colleagues analysing a financial chart on a computer.

How do climate risks affect trading behaviour?

by Andreas Charisiadis, Research Assistant, Cambridge Centre for Finance and Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance Mitigating climate change has become one of the defining challenges of our time. Indeed, there is global concern about the potentially disastrous long-term consequences…

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Cityscape with polluted air.

Business Weekly: Cambridge Judge Business School finds hope for change in gender bias study

A study co-authored by Professor Raghavendra Rau and PhD student Jinhua Wang at Cambridge Judge Business School finds that ‘gender-based attention bias’ toward women mutual fund managers works both ways, lowering fund-flow volatility, and this could boost the current low…

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Counterintuitive bias

A new study at Cambridge Judge Business School finds that ‘gender-based attention bias’ toward women mutual fund managers works both ways, lowering fund-flow volatility, and this could boost the current low number of women fund managers. Professor Raghavendra Rau The…

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A businesswoman looks out of the window of a skyscraper at the city below.

LexBlog: Do investors pay less attention to women fund managers?

Raghavendra Rau, Sir Evelyn de Rothschild Professor of Finance at Cambridge Judge Business School, discusses his latest study looking into women fund managers. The study documents “a different and previously unstudied type of gender bias in investor behavior, which we…

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Toeing the line

Conformity with environmental, social and governance (ESG) practices can carry negative reputation 'spillovers' when peers are publicly criticised, says paper at Cambridge Judge recognised for two Academy of Management awards. Companies seek the "safety of conformity" in an environment of…

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Portrait of a couple of investors looking concerned.

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