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organisational behaviour

Newsweek: Internet overjoyed as boss forcing employee to work thanksgiving backfires

Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor of Organisation Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, comments about an employer forcing an employee to work on Thanksgiving. The employer's behaviour was "unfair and risky." Thomas says. Read the full article [newsweek.com]…

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Financial Times: The retirees heading back to work

Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor of Organisational Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, speaks about older people in need of additional income and wanting to socialise, looking for jobs again. There is still a “stigma” when it comes to hiring older…

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Robots in fashion: how creatives are working with AI

Study on how creative people work collaboratively with artificial intelligence by Alentina Vardanyan, a PhD candidate at Cambridge Judge, wins award from Academy of Management.   Alentina Vardanyan A paper by Alentina Vardanyan, a PhD candidate at Cambridge Judge Business…

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Phys.org: Why keeping it in the family can be good news when it comes to CEOs

A study co-authored by Jochen Menges, Associate Professor in Organisational Behaviour at Cambridge Judge Business School, is mentioned in this article about CEOs in family firms. According to the study “Research suggests that firms with family CEOs differ from other…

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Business Insider: Resentment is mounting as some employees are forced back to the office and some are allowed to work from home

Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor of Organisational Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, speaks about return-to-office and fairness in the workplace. "If you're offering two different types of employees different access to work, you potentially create an issue of equity," Thomas…

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Financial Times: Quiet quitting – What managers can do

A study by Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor in Organisation Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, is featured in the Financial Times Business School newsletter. Dealing with a lack of engagement in the workplace is a common problem. Thomas Roulet proposes…

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UK Business News: CEOs who also serve as board chair are more risk-averse in foreign expansion, says Dean Mauro Guillén.

Mauro Guillén, Dean of Cambridge Judge Business School, presents a new study of Spanish firms, especially focused on CEOs. “CEOs of firms that fail to meet performance targets have long sought to expand abroad to lift their fortunes, because these…

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Forbes: How failed leaders make successful comebacks: Boris Johnson and the saviour strategy

Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor in Organisational Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, writes about failed leaders making successful comebacks. “The comebacks of failed corporate and political leaders are not that uncommon,” Thomas writes. “In situations of uncertainty, when the boat…

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Why people’s sense of (un)fairness can harm their own interests

The ‘hold-up problem’ in business: new study co-authored at Cambridge Judge Business School highlights how concerns about fairness thwart beneficial reciprocity. A common dilemma facing investors is whether a partner receiving an investment will receive most of the gains flowing…

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A man and woman stand holding ladders of success with unequal steps.

Quiet quitting: what managers can do

'Quiet quitting' is not a novel concept and there are clear ways to combat it, Thomas Roulet of Cambridge Judge Business School says in MIT Sloan Management Review. Dr Thomas Roulet The in-vogue term 'quiet quitting' is not a new…

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