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workplace psychology

Newsweek: Internet overjoyed as boss forcing employee to work thanksgiving backfires

Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor of Organisation Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, comments about an employer forcing an employee to work on Thanksgiving. The employer's behaviour was "unfair and risky." Thomas says. Read the full article [newsweek.com]…

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Business Insider: Resentment is mounting as some employees are forced back to the office and some are allowed to work from home

Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor of Organisational Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, speaks about return-to-office and fairness in the workplace. "If you're offering two different types of employees different access to work, you potentially create an issue of equity," Thomas…

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Yahoo.com (La Nacion): Demonised industries – why people choose to work in companies with a bad reputation

Payment is a lever that might work for some positions and some people, but not for everyone. And it hardly satisfies as a psychological explanation. "Yes, I work for a hideous company, but at least the pay is great," isn't…

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The Economist: Why employees want to work in vilified industries

A book by Thomas Roulet, Associate Professor in Organisation Theory at Cambridge Judge Business School, entitled “The Power of Being Divisive”, points out that employees of demonised firms are often proud to be on the payroll. A study by Thomas…

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Workplace Insight: Employees who practice mindfulness are more likely to think their job is stimulating

Study titled “It’s so boring – or is it? Examining the role of mindfulness for work performance and attitudes in monotonous jobs”, co-authored by Jochen Menges, Associate Professor in Organisational Behaviour at Cambridge Judge Business School, is mentioned in this…

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Mindfulness at work: why it matters

More mindful employees perceive their job as less boring and are less likely to quit, says a study co-authored by Jochen Menges of Cambridge Judge Business School. How mindfulness impacts quality of work Dr Jochen Menges In monotonous jobs, “mindful”…

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Monotonous tasks may be made easier using mindfulness.

Fortune: Climbing the corporate ladder yields greater emotional benefits for men than women, study shows

A study co-authored by Jochen Menges, professor at the University of Zurich and at Cambridge Judge Business School, and titled "Gender and emotions at work: organisational rank has greater emotional benefits for men than women." is mentioned in this article…

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The promotion emotion

Promotion at work has greater emotional benefit for men than women, says a new study on gender and workplace emotion co-authored by Dr Jochen Menges of Cambridge Judge Business School. Women and men feel different at work, as moving up…

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The promotion emotion: promotion at work has greater emotional benefit for men than women.

Phys.org: Women are ‘running with leaded shoes’ when promoted at work, says study

Promotion at work has greater emotional benefit for men than women, says a new study on gender and workplace emotion co-authored by Jochen Menges, Associate Professor in Organisational Behaviour at Cambridge Judge Business School. The study notes that, while the…

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Taming the ‘green-eyed monster’ at work

Should I stay or should I go? Envious employees who strive for co-operation are more likely to be absent and quit than those who seek to excel at work, finds a new study co-authored by Dr Jochen Menges of Cambridge…

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Taming the ‘green-eyed monster’ at work.

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